“Everyone has the right to a nationality”

WEBINAR SERIES - Closing protection gaps: Addressing statelessness

Register your place for a free webinar series organised by the European Network on Statelessness (ENS) in collaboration with Fundación Cepaim.  

New publication: No Child should be stateless

This new ENS paper was developed as part of the Initiative on Children in Migration for those who would like to know more about statelessness and how it affects children in migration.

Compare European countries using our Statelessness Index

Our StatelessnessINDEX now includes analysis on 24 countries.

New website on stateless refugees in Europe

Statelessness is often overlooked in asylum and migration debates. It is a hidden but very real issue affecting many refugees and migrants in Europe.

Read our new five-year strategic plan

It sets out the ambitious next stage of our development and a clear path to achieving our mission. 

WEBINAR SERIES - Closing protection gaps: Addressing statelessness
New publication: No Child should be stateless
Compare European countries using our Statelessness Index
New website on stateless refugees in Europe
Read our new five-year strategic plan

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Statelessness affects more than 10 million people around the world and over 500,000 in Europe alone. To be stateless is to not be recognized as a citizen by any state. It is a legal anomaly that often prevents people from accessing fundamental civil, political, economic, cultural and social rights.

The European Network on Statelessness is a civil society alliance committed to address statelessness in Europe. We believe that all human beings have a right to a nationality and that those who lack nationality altogether are entitled to full protection of their human rights.

In Europe, statelessness occurs both among recent migrants and among people who have lived in the same place for generations. Most countries in the region frequently encounter stateless persons in their asylum systems. In the Balkans and elsewhere many Roma remain stateless as a result of ethnic discrimination. Statelessness is also a continuing reminder of the break-up of the Soviet Union.

Despite the scale of the problem, most European countries have no framework to effectively deal with statelessness and tackling this requires major law and policy reform. The European Network on Statelessness is dedicated to strengthening the often unheard voice of stateless persons in Europe and to advocate for full respect of their human rights.

  • Too often, stateless people

    lead invisible lives – more must be done to identify this vulnerable population