Photo: TeaMeister (flickr - Creative Commons) Blog

How far do citizenship laws in European Union Member States safeguard the children born there from statelessness?

Most European Union Member States participate in the international conventions concerning statelessness of 1954 and 1961, and have certain laws that…
/ Merve Erdilmen (Doctoral Student, Department of Political Science, McGill University) and Iseult Honohan (Associate Professor Emeritus, School of Politics and International Relations, University College Dublin)
Blog

Birthright citizenship and children born in a conflict zone

As of 1 February 2020, an amendment to the Danish citizenship act means that a child born to a Danish parent who has unlawfully entered or stays in a…
/ Eva Ersbøll – Lawyer and Senior Researcher, ENS Associate Member
Blog

The Convention on the Rights of the Child at 30: Action still needed to fulfil every child’s right to a nationality in Europe

On World Children’s Day, politicians, civil society representatives, children and others gathered at the European Parliament for a high-level…
/ Khadija Badri, Advocacy and Engagement Officer at the European Network on Statelessness
Blog

Windrush scandal exposes what may lie ahead for children born in the UK growing up without citizenship

Last year, we wrote about the many barriers to stateless children born in the UK exercising their right to register as British citizens. Those…
/ Solange Valdez-Symonds, PRCBC and Steve Valdez-Symonds, Amnesty International UK
Blog

Roma in Serbia still denied birth certificates – ENS members take legal action to challenge register offices’ unlimited power

The purist in me imagines bureaucrats running around maternity wards, struggling to catch all the details (“Name? Mother’s name? Sorry, can you…
/ Adam Weiss – European Roma Rights Centre (ERRC)
Blog

A Generation of Syrians Born in Exile Risk a Future of Statelessness

Doctor Nazir’s pregnant wife arrived in Turkey with a one-year old and no documentation. They had fled the unbearable bombardment of their home town…
/ Sarnata Reynolds and Tori Duoos, Refugees International
Blog

The jus sanguinis bias of Europe and what it means for childhood statelessness

Who is more Dutch: a child born to Dutch nationals in Australia (child A), or a child born to Australian nationals in the Netherlands (child B)?…
/ Caia Vlieks (Tilburg University) and Katja Swider (University of Amsterdam)
Blog

Jus Soli: A miraculous solution to prevent statelessness?

Granting nationality at birth to children born on the territory of a country – the “jus soli” principle – is often seen as an effective tool to…
/ Charline Becker, Hungarian Helsinki Committee
Blog

Litigating Strategically: Stateless children born in the EU

Does a child born in the EU, who would have been an EU citizen had the Member State of birth complied with its international obligations, but who is…
/ Katja Swider, University of Amsterdam and René de Groot, Maastricht University
Blog

Networking for change – Statelessness events in Strasbourg and making a difference?

Perhaps borne from a certain sense of frustration, many of us working on statelessness often feel compelled to emphasise the hidden nature of the…
/ Chris Nash, Coordinator of the European Network on Statelessness
Blog

Europe must not allow its children to grow up without a nationality

How do you explain statelessness to a child? Yes, you were born here. And yes, mummy comes from here. And yes, daddy comes from here. And yes, you…
/ Laura van Waas, Senior Researcher and Manager of the Statelessness Programme, Tilburg University
Blog

Nationality Unknown? Promising steps, but still a risk of statelessness at birth in Hungary

Hungary is a state party to all statelessness-related international conventions, and as one of the few states in the world to operate a specific…
/ Gábor Gyulai, Hungarian Helsinki Committee, Chair of the ENS Steering Committee